RobGalbraith.com
Go to advertiser website.
     Home
     RSS
     CF/SD/XQD
     About
     Contact
Go
Go to advertiser website.
 
Canon unveils EOS-1D Mark II - Continued

While the 1D MKII's new 8.2 million actual image pixel sensor and 8.5 fps shooting rate at full resolution are likely to capture the most attention, Canon has been busy beavering away on other areas of the camera too.

There are promised improvements to Canon's already-stellar 45-point Area AF system and not-so-stellar E-TTL flash. Plus, the 1D MKII offers an impressive array of controls over image colour, includes niceties such as the ability to save and load a comprehensive camera settings file, it accepts both CompactFlash and Secure Digital cards (there's one card slot for each type) and can be configured to display individual RGB channel histograms. Zoomed playback and video out, two features that never made it into the original 1D, are present and accounted for in the 1D MKII.

The table below summarizes the key differences between the 1D MKII and the camera it replaces. The new model's combination of high speed and high resolution means that any number of different models could also have been included for competitive comparison. Whether it's the Nikon D2H for the news and sports photographer who sometimes needs more than 4MP of resolution, the Nikon D1X for the photographer who has been limited by that camera's 3 fps shooting rate or the EOS-1Ds for the photographer who has needed lots of pixels but has been unwilling to pay the price premium Canon's 11MP camera commands, the 1D MKII is uniquely positioned to tackle them all.

canon_1dmkII_left_2470.jpg

Looked at another way, the 1D MKII doesn't fit neatly into any one digital SLR category; rather, it traverses a number of different ones, and ultimately would seem to be without a direct competitor. If the camera performs as well as its specs suggest, that should have Canon laughing all the way to the bank.

A Comparison of the Canon EOS-1D Mark II and EOS-1D

Text describing differences between the two models is highlighted in red.

Feature
EOS-1D Mark II
EOS-1D
Comments
Autofocus System TTL-AREA-SIR utilizing CMOS-type AF sensor
 45-point Area AF (7 sensors are cross-type with f/2.8 or faster lenses)
AF detection range: 0 EV to +18 EV (ISO 100, normal temperature)
Focus modes: One Shot AF, AI Servo AF and manual
AF point selection: automatic or manual with user-selectable home position
AF-assist beam: none (can use AF-assist beam of compatible Speedlite)
 Two AF microprocessors enables twice as many AF readings per unit of time for improved AI Servo focus prediction and quicker acquiring of focus in One Shot or before the first frame in sequence shooting
TTL-AREA-SIR utilizing CMOS-type AF sensor
 45-point Area AF (7 sensors are cross-type with f/2.8 or faster lenses)
AF detection range: 0 EV to +18 EV (ISO 100, normal temperature)
Focus modes: One Shot AF, AI Servo AF and manual
AF point selection: automatic or manual with user-selectable home position
AF-assist beam: none (can use AF-assist beam of compatible Speedlite)
A single microprocessor controls AF operation

By splitting the AF duties between two microprocessors, the EOS-1D MKII is promised to be quicker at acquiring the focus when the AF system is first engaged, as well as smarter about predicting the point of focus of the subject in sequence shooting.

Canon already has one of the best AF systems around in the original EOS-1D; we hope that the combination of twin AF processing CPUs, and the AF algorithm Canon developed for the new camera, make a good thing even better.

Shutter Shutter derived from, but not the same as, that found in the EOS-1Ds and EOS-1V
Shutter is rated to 200,000+ cycles
Shutter controls exposure time
Shutter is the same as EOS-3
Shutter is rated to 150,000+ cycles
Exposure time is controlled electronically with the CCD
Controlling the shutter speed electronically within the image sensor, as the 1D does, allows for a higher standard top flash sync speed, as well as the ability to sync with non-dedicated strobes at positively stratospheric shutter speeds. We'll take a higher sync speed over a shutter rated for more cycles any day.
Shooting Modes and Shooting Speed High-Speed Continuous: approx. 8.5 fps (adjustable)
Low-Speed Continuous: approx. 3 fps (adjustable)
55ms shutter lag (can be reduced to 40ms when lens is set to maximum aperture)
87ms mirror blackout (1/60th or faster shutter speed)
Approx. 40 frame JPEG buffer, 20 frame RAW/RAW+JPEG buffer
When power switch is turned to Off, camera finishes writing all photos to the card before powering down
If the card door is opened mid-write, the camera pauses, then resumes writing once the card door is closed again

High-Speed Continuous: approx. 8.0 fps (adjustable)
Low-Speed Continuous: approx. 3 fps (adjustable)
55ms shutter lag
87ms mirror blackout (1/60th or faster shutter speed)
Maximum 21 frame buffer; buffer depth is reduced to as few as 14 frames when shooting RAW, RAW+JPEG and/or at higher ISO settings

When power switch is turned to Off, camera finishes writing all photos to the card before powering down
If the card door is opened mid-write, all photos remaining in the buffer are lost

A burst depth of up to 40 frames is great; even the 20 frame RAW/RAW+JPEG buffer is a solid improvement over what's come before.
Ambient Metering 21-zone TTL full-aperture exposure metering system
Evaluative metering (linkable to any AF point)
 Partial metering: approx. 13.5% of viewfinder in centre of frame
 Centreweighted averaging metering
Spot Metering: 3.8% of viewfinder, either centre focus point or active focus point
Multi-spot metering: up to 8 readings will be averaged
21-zone TTL full-aperture exposure metering system
Evaluative metering (linkable to any AF point)
 Partial metering: approx. 13.5% of viewfinder in centre of frame
 Centreweighted averaging metering
Spot Metering: 3.8% of viewfinder, either centre focus point or active focus point
Multi-spot metering: up to 8 readings will be averaged
ISO Range 100 - 1600 in 1/3 step increments, plus 50 and 3200 200 - 1600 in 1/3 step increments, plus 100 and 3200 ISO 100 is a welcome addition to the standard ISO range
Exposure 30-1/8000 second in 1/3 step increments, plus Bulb
Long exposure noise reduction possible (when enabled, reduction is applied to exposures of 1 second or longer)

Exposure modes:
Program (shiftable)
Shutter Priority
Aperture Priority
Manual

Exposure compensation possible:
-3 to +3 EV in 1/3 EV increments
Exposure bracketing and ISO speed bracketing possible
30-1/16,000 second in 1/3 step increments, plus Bulb
Long exposure noise reduction possible (when enabled, reduction is applied to exposures of 1/15 second or longer)

Exposure modes:
Program (shiftable)
Shutter Priority
Aperture Priority
Manual

Exposure compensation possible:
-3 to +3 EV in 1/3 EV increments
Exposure bracketing and ISO speed bracketing possible
Flash E-TTL II flash exposure control with compatible Speedlites
User-selectable evaluative or averaging through-the-lens flash metering in both AF and manual focus modes
Hot shoe and PC sync terminal included
Maximum standard flash sync speed: 1/250; compatible Speedlites will sync with camera above 1/250 only if High Speed Sync mode enabled
Flash sync well above the standard sync speed with non-dedicated flashes is not possible, owing to the control of the exposure time by the shutter
E-TTL flash exposure control with compatible Speedlites
Averaging through-the-lens flash metering only possible when AF is not active
Hot shoe and PC sync terminal included
Maximum standard flash sync speed: 1/500; compatible Speedlites will sync with camera above 1/250 only if High Speed Sync mode enabled
Flash sync well above the standard sync speed with non-dedicated flashes is possible, owing to the control of the exposure time electronically within the CCD image sensor

E-TTL II, says Canon, will greatly improve flash exposure accuracy even when the scene is  dominated by dark or light tones, and that because the system is no longer biased to the active focus point, focusing, then recomposing, will not result in a flash exposure error.

With newer Canon EF lenses, distance data also forms part of the E-TTL II flash exposure calculation, acting primarily as a sanity check on the reflectance info coming back from the 17 metering cells being used to compare the ambient and flash light

If the reworked TTL in the 1D MKII means better, more consistent flash exposures, this will be a breakthrough in Canon flash photography

Viewfinder Eye-level pentaprism
Eyepoint: 20mm
Built-in diopter adjustment of -3.0 to +1.0
Frame coverage: Approx. 100%
Focusing screen is interrchangeable; Ec-CIII focusing screen standard; 9 focusing screens available in all
Built-in eyepiece shutter
Eye-level pentaprism
Eyepoint: 20mm
Built-in diopter adjustment of -3.0 to +1.0
Frame coverage: Approx. 100%
Focusing screen is interrchangeable; Ec-CIII focusing screen standard; 9 focusing screens available in all
Built-in eyepiece shutter
The 1D has a sharp, clear, cast-free viewfinder that appears to be plopped unchanged onto the 1D MKII. No complaints here.
Orientation Sensor Yes No
Microphone Yes; camera records WAV format sound files up to 30 seconds in length Yes; camera records WAV format sound files up to 30 seconds in length
Custom-ization 21 Custom Functions with 67 settings
27 Personal Functions
Saving and loading of camera settings file possible
21 Custom Functions with 67 settings
25 Personal Functions
Digital cameras like the 1D MKII can be time-consuming to configure. Being able to store and reload a settings file that keeps track of just about everything should be a time-saver. The settings file can be loaded into any number of 1D MKII's to ease the setup of cameras at major events, for example.
Sensor Type Canon-designed CMOS image sensor with 8-channel readout
Bayer pattern RGB filter array
CCD image sensor with 2-channel readout
Bayer pattern RGB filter array
Sensor Dimensions 28.7mm x 19.1mm sensor size
8.2m x 8.2m pixel pitch
28.7mm x 19.1mm sensor size
11.5m x 11.5m pixel pitch

All things being equal, a camera with a smaller pixel size will produce noisier photos than one with a larger pixel size.

But, all things are not equal in this case. When Canon designed the 1D, they were only beginning to understand how to best massage sensor data to keep noise at bay, and were working with a sensor they designed but did not produce.

The 1D MKII not only sports a sensor that features higher-efficiency microlenses for improved light-gathering ability, but its engineers were able to draw on several years of experience knocking back image noise in designing the image processing circuitry in the new model.

We're optimistic - confident even - that the photos coming from the 1D MKII are going to be smoother and considerably less noisy than the 1D, despite the 1D's pixel pitch advantage.

Sensor Output 12-bits per colour
Image data processed with Canon-designed DIGIC II processor
12-bits per colour
Image data processed with Canon-designed DIGIC processor
Actual Image Size Large: 3504 x 2336 pixels (about 8.2 MP)
Medium1: 3104 x 2072 pixels (about 6.4 MP)
Medium2: 2544 x 1696 pixels (about 4.3 MP)
Small: 1728 x 1152 pixels (about 2.0 MP)
Large: 2464 x 1648 pixels (about 4.1 MP)
Small: 1232 x 824 pixels (about 1.0 MP)
Focal length cropping factor

Approx. 1.3x (relative to 35mm film frame)

Approx. 1.3x (relative to 35mm film frame)
Low-Pass Filter? Yes Yes
File Formats JPEG 10 different compression levels (choosable in the camera) and 4 different output resolutions
RAW .CR2 (compressed, Large output resolution only)
Camera adheres to DCF 2.0 and EXIF 2.2.1 specifications
JPEG 10 different compression levels (compression settings other than 8 or 3 must be configured as part of a Parameter Set then transferred via FireWire to the camera) and 2 different output resolutions
RAW .TIF (compressed, Large output resolution only)
Colour Looks

Five standard colour looks are choosable in the camera:
Color Matrix 1 (sRGB)
Color Matrix 2 (sRGB)
Color Matrix 3 (sRGB)
Color Matrix 4 (Adobe RGB (1998))
Color Matrix 5 (sRGB)

Two additional Color Matrix settings are user-configurable (colour space, saturation and skin tone rendering), allowing for the creation of personal colour looks
 An ICC profile isn't embedded into photos. The camera does, however, mark any photos it has processed out to Adobe RGB (1998) as such, through a clunky method allowed under the DCF 2.0/EXIF 2.2.1 specifications.
Camera includes White Balance Compensation function that enables adjustment of blue/amber and magenta/green colour bias in +/-9 steps

Five standard colour looks are choosable in the camera:
Color Matrix 1 (sRGB)
Color Matrix 2 (sRGB)
Color Matrix 3 (sRGB)
Color Matrix 4 (Adobe RGB (1998))
Color Matrix 5 (sRGB)

An ICC profile isn't embedded into photos, and the camera marks photos shot on all Color Matrix Settings (even setting 4) as sRGB in the EXIF ColorSpace tag

Being able to create a custom Color Matrix is great. For one thing, it means that it's possible to choose the colour look separate from the colour space, such that if you prefer a really saturated look reminiscent of Color Matrix 3, but want JPEGs to emerge from the camera in the Adobe RGB colour space, it will be possible to achieve that through one of the custom Color Matrix settings.

The White Balance Compensation feature will potentially allow for careful tuning of the colour to achieve better results under icky fluorescent and other artificial lighting, as well as to warm up or cool down slightly the selected manual WB setting. If it's not too difficult to actually use in practice, this could be a cool feature.

Auto White Balance 3000K to 7000K operating range
AWB calculation performed from image data exclusively
3000K to 7000K operating range
Hybrid AWB calculation performed from image data and readings from an on-camera sensor
Canon is promising that the refined AWB algorithm in the EOS-1D MKII will produce AWB results that are comparable to or better than what the 1D can achieve with its Hybrid AWB system
Manual WB Tungsten (3200K)
Fluorescent (4000K)
Daylight (5200K)
Flash (5600K)
Cloudy (6000K)
Shade (7000K)
Kelvin: 2800K - 10,000K in 100K increments
White Balance Bracketing (+/-3 steps in 5, 10 or 15 mired increments)
Tungsten (3200K)
Fluorescent (4000K)
Daylight (5200K)
Flash (5600K)
Cloudy (6000K)
Shade (7000K)
Kelvin: 2800K - 10,000K in 100K increments
White Balance Bracketing (+/-3 steps in 5, 10 or 15 mired increments)
Custom WB Custom White Balance (CWB) is read from area within spot metering circle
Up to 3 Personal White Balance settings can be stored in the camera
Custom White Balance (CWB) is read from area within spot metering circle
Up to 3 Personal White Balance settings can be stored in the camera
Parameters Standard, plus 3 sets that are user-configurable in the camera Standard, plus 3 sets that must be configured on the computer then transferred via FireWire to the camera
Contrast Standard tone curve
Up to 3 additional tone curves may be loaded into the camera
5 increment Contrast control is combined with the active tone curve, allowing for a reduction or increase in contrast relative to the active tone curve
Standard tone curve
Up to 3 additional tone curves may be loaded into the camera
The addition of a Contrast control, in addition to a tone curve, we hope will allow for sufficient control over image contrast that actually having to create and load custom tone curves will not be necessary for the typical user
Sharpening

6 increments that are similar to Amount values in Photoshop's Unsharp Mask; includes a setting that applies no sharpening

6 increments that are similar to Amount values in Photoshop's Unsharp Mask; includes a setting that applies no sharpening
5-increment Pattern Sharpness setting that provides the equivalent of Radius values in Photoshop's Unsharp Mask

Gone from the 1D MKII is the Pattern Sharpness control, which is fine as long as the fixed Pattern Sharpness that's applied is the equivalent of a relatively low Radius in Photoshop's Unsharp Mask. And at this point, we don't know if it is.
Image Storage Two card slots: CompactFlash Type I/II (including Microdrive) and Secure Digital (SD)
FAT12/16 support
FAT32 support for cards over 2GB
Lexar Media's speed-boosting Write Acceleration (WA) technology is not supported (though Lexar cards should work just fine in the 1D MKII, as cameras don't need to support WA to be compatible with Lexar's products)
Camera can write to CompactFlash and SD cards simultaneously or separately; it's not possible to store RAW files on one card and JPEGs on the other
Maximum throughput to the card interface, says Canon, is 5.0MB/sec
Single CompactFlash Type I/II (including Microdrive)
FAT12/16 support
Lexar Media's speed-boosting Write Acceleration (WA) technology is not supported (though Lexar cards work just fine in the camera)
Maximum throughput to the card interface, says Canon, is 3.2MB/sec

 

Remote Control Remote triggering via N3-type terminal
 Remote control and image transfer via FireWire (4-pin port) connection to a computer
 FireWire data transfer rate, says Canon, is 100MBps
Remote triggering via N3-type terminal
 Remote control and image transfer via FireWire (6-pin port) connection to a computer
 FireWire data transfer rate, says Canon, is 40MBps
Direct Printing

Yes; EOS-1D Mark II includes a USB 1.1 port for direct connection to a compatible printer

No
GPS Support No No
Video Out Yes; NTSC and PAL No
User-Upgradeable Firmware? Yes Yes
Rear LCD Monitor 2.0", 230,000-dot TFT LCD with white LED backlighting
5-increment brightness adjustment
2.0", 120,000-dot TFT LCD with fluorescent backlighting
5-increment brightness adjustment
Playback Modes Single image viewing
Single image with saturated highlights display
Single image with shooting information (including luminosity or individual R,G,B channels histogram)
Single image with shooting information and saturated highlights display (including luminosity or individual R,G,B channels histogram)
4-up image viewing
9-up image viewing
15-step zoom (1.5x to 10x magnification) and scroll
Single image viewing
Single image with saturated highlights display
Single image with shooting information (including luminosity histogram)
Single image with shooting information and saturated highlights display (including luminosity histogram)
4-up image viewing
9-up image viewing
Photographers who rely on the histogram to set their exposure will appreciate the new individual R,G,B channels histogram
Dimensions 156 x 157.6 x 79.9mm (6.1 x 6.2 x 3.1 in.) 156 x 157.6 x 79.9mm (6.1 x 6.2 x 3.1 in.)
Weight 1220g (43 oz.) without battery
1555g (54.8 oz.) with NP-E3 battery
1250g (44.1 oz.) without battery
1585g (55.9 oz.) with NP-E3 battery
Power

Battery:
12V DC/1650mAH NP-E3 NiMH rechargeable battery
Frames per charge: approx. 1200 at 20C/68F; approx. 800 at 0C/32F

AC power:
DC Coupler Kit DCK-E1

Battery:
12V DC/1650mAH NP-E3 NiMH rechargeable battery
Frames per charge: approx. 500 at 20C/68F; approx. 350 at 0C/32F

AC power:
DC Coupler Kit DCK-E1

Software that can process the camera's RAW format EOS Viewer Utility
Digital Photo Professional
EOS Viewer Utility
Digital Photo Professional
Phase One C1 Pro/SE
Adobe Photoshop Camera Raw plug-in
Other third party applications

Even though we've only only looked at Digital Photo Professional briefly as we write this, it's clear already that it will be light years ahead of the software formerly known as File Viewer Utility.

For those who prefer a third party solution, expect that it could take some time for the new camera's RAW files to be broadly supported.

Data Verification Yes; requires Data Verification Kit DVK-E2 No
Next Page: Menu, Software Screenshots
Go to Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 
Go to advertiser website.
2000-2013 Little Guy Media. Not to be reproduced without written permission.